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NOTES
- Preface
PART VI
- Introduction
CHAPTER I
Of the Causes of a Courtesan resorting to Men; of the means of
q PART I:
Attaching to herself the Man desired, and the kind of Man that it is
INTRODUCTORY
desirable to be acquainted with
- Chapter I
- Chapter II
- Chapter III
- Chapter IV By having intercourse with men courtesans obtain sexual pleasure, as well as
- Chapter V their own maintenance. Now when a courtesan takes up with a man from love,
the action is natural; but when she resorts to him for the purpose of getting
money, her action is artificial or forced. Even in the latter case, however, she
q PART II: ON SEXUAL
should conduct herself as if her love were indeed natural, because men repose
UNION
- Chapter I their confidence on those women who apparently love them. In making known
- Chapter II her love to the man, she should show an entire freedom from avarice, and for
- Chapter III the sake of her future credit she should abstain from acquiring money from him
- Chapter IV by unlawful means.
- Chapter V
- Chapter VI
A courtesan, well dressed and wearing her ornaments, should sit or stand at the
- Chapter VII
door of her house, and, without exposing herself too much, should look on the
- Chapter VIII
public road so as to be seen by the passers by, she being like an object on view
- Chapter IX
for sale. (1) She should form friendships with such persons as would enable her
- Chapter X
to separate men from other women, and attach them to herself, to repair her
own misfortunes, to acquire wealth, and to protect her from being bullied, or
q PART III: ABOUT THE
set upon by persons with whom she may have dealings of some kind or
ACQUISITION OF A
another.
WIFE
- Chapter I
- Chapter II
These persons are:
- Chapter III
- Chapter IV
The guards of the town, or the police
- Chapter V q

The officers of the courts of justice
q

Astrologers
q
PART IV: ABOUT A
q
Powerful men, or men with interest
WIFE q

Learned men
- Chapter I q

Teachers of the sixty-four arts
- Chapter II q

Pithamardas or confidants
q

Vitas or parasites
q
PART V: ABOUT THE
q
Vidushakas or jesters
WIVES OF OTHER q

Flower sellers
PEOPLE q
- Chapter I Perfumers
q
- Chapter II Vendors of spirits
q
- Chapter III Washermen
q
- Chapter IV Barbers
q
- Chapter V Beggars
q
- Chapter VI

And such other persons as may be found necessary for the particular object to
PART VI: ABOUT be acquired.
q
COURTESANS
- Introductory Remarks -
The following kinds of men may be taken up with, simply for the purpose of
Chapter I
getting their money:
- Chapter II
q Men of independent income
- Chapter III
q Young men
- Chapter IV
q Men who are free from any ties
- Chapter V
- Chapter VI q Men who hold places of authority under the king

q Men who have secured their means of livelihood without difficulty

q PART VII: ON THE
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MEANS OF ATTRACTING
OTHERS TO ONE'S SELF
- Chapter I
- Chapter II


CONCLUDING
q

REMARKS


q MODERN KAMA

SUTRA


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q TRANSLATOR'S
NOTES
- Preface
PART VI
- Introduction
CHAPTER II
Of a Courtesan living with a Man as his Wife
q PART I:
INTRODUCTORY
- Chapter I
- Chapter II
- Chapter III
- Chapter IV
- Chapter V


q PART II: ON SEXUAL
UNION
- Chapter I
- Chapter II
- Chapter III
- Chapter IV
- Chapter V
- Chapter VI
- Chapter VII
- Chapter VIII
- Chapter IX
- Chapter X


q PART III: ABOUT THE
ACQUISITION OF A
WIFE
- Chapter I
- Chapter II
- Chapter III
- Chapter IV
- Chapter V


q PART IV: ABOUT A
WIFE
- Chapter I
- Chapter II


q PART V: ABOUT THE
WIVES OF OTHER
PEOPLE
- Chapter I
When a courtesan is living as a wife with her lover, she should behave like a
- Chapter II
chaste woman, and do everything to his satisfaction. Her duty in this respect, in
- Chapter III
short, is, that she should give him pleasure, but should not become attached to
- Chapter IV
him, though behaving as if she were really attached.
- Chapter V
- Chapter VI
Now the following is the manner in which she is to conduct herself, so as to
accomplish the above mentioned purpose. She should have a mother
q PART VI: ABOUT
dependent on her, one who should be represented as very harsh, and who
COURTESANS
- Introductory Remarks - looked upon money as her chief object in life. In the event of there being no
Chapter I mother, then an old and confidential nurse should play the same role. The
- Chapter II mother or nurse, on their part, should appear to be displeased with the lover,
- Chapter III and forcibly take her away from him. The woman herself should always show
- Chapter IV pretended anger, dejection, fear, and shame on this account, but should not
- Chapter V
disobey the mother or nurse at any time.
- Chapter VI


q PART VII: ON THE
MEANS OF ATTRACTING
OTHERS TO ONE'S SELF
- Chapter I
- Chapter II


CONCLUDING
q

REMARKS


q MODERN KAMA

SUTRA


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q TRANSLATOR'S
NOTES
- Preface
PART VI
- Introduction
CHAPTER III
Of the Means of getting Money; of the Signs of a Lover who is beginning
q PART I:
to be Weary, and of the way to get rid of him
INTRODUCTORY
- Chapter I
- Chapter II
Money is got out of a lover in two ways:
- Chapter III
- Chapter IV By natural or lawful means, and by artifices. Old authors are of opinion that
- Chapter V when a courtesan can get as much money as she wants from her lover, she
should not make use of artifice. But Vatsyayana lays down that though she may
get some money from him by natural means, yet when she makes use of
q PART II: ON SEXUAL
artifice he gives her doubly more, and therefore artifice should be resorted to
UNION
- Chapter I for the purpose of extorting money from him at all events.
- Chapter II
- Chapter III
Now the artifices to be used for getting money from her lover are as follows:
- Chapter IV
- Chapter V
q Taking money from him on different occasions, for the purpose of purchasing
- Chapter VI
various articles, such as ornaments, food, drink, flowers, perfumes and clothes,
- Chapter VII
and either not buying them, or getting from him more than their cost.
- Chapter VIII
q Praising his intelligence to his face.
- Chapter IX
q Pretending to be obliged to make gifts on occasion of festivals connected with
- Chapter X
vows, trees, gardens, temples, or tanks.1
q Pretending that at the time of going to his house, her jewels have been
q PART III: ABOUT THE
stolen either by the king's guards, or by robbers.
ACQUISITION OF A
WIFE q Alleging that her property has been destroyed by fire, by the falling of her
- Chapter I house, or by the carelessness of her servants.
- Chapter II
q Pretending to have lost the ornaments of her lover along with her own.
- Chapter III
q Causing him to hear through other people of the expenses incurred by her in
- Chapter IV
coming to see him.
- Chapter V
q Contracting debts for the sake of her lover.

q Disputing with her mother on account of some expense incurred by her for
q PART IV: ABOUT A her lover, and which was not approved of by her mother.
WIFE q Not going to parties and festivities in the houses of her friends for the want of
- Chapter I
presents to make to them, she having previously informed her lover of the
- Chapter II
valuable presents given to her by these very friends.
q Not performing certain festive rites under the pretence that she has no
q PART V: ABOUT THE money to perform them with.
WIVES OF OTHER
q Engaging artists to do something for her lover.
PEOPLE
q Entertaining physicians and ministers for the purpose of attaining some
- Chapter I
object.
- Chapter II
q Assisting friends and benefactors both on festive occasions, and in
- Chapter III
misfortune.
- Chapter IV
q Performing household rites.
- Chapter V
q Having to pay the expenses of the ceremony of marriage of the son of a
- Chapter VI
female friend.
q Having to satisfy curious wishes including her state of pregnancy.
q PART VI: ABOUT
q Pretending to be ill, and charging her cost of treatment.
COURTESANS
q Having to remove the troubles of a friend.
- Introductory Remarks -
q Selling some of her ornaments, so as to give her lover a present.
Chapter I
q Pretending to sell some of her ornaments, furniture, or cooking utensils to a
- Chapter II
trader, who has been already tutored how to behave in the matter.
- Chapter III
q Having to buy cooking utensils of greater value than those of other people, so
- Chapter IV
that they might be more easily distinguished, and not changed for others of an
- Chapter V
inferior description.
- Chapter VI
q Remembering the former favours of her lover, and causing them always to be

spoken of by her friends and followers.
q PART VII: ON THE
q Informing her lover of the great gains of other courtesans.
MEANS OF ATTRACTING
q Describing before them, and in the presence of her lover, her own great
OTHERS TO ONE'S SELF
- Chapter I gains, and making them out to be greater even than theirs, though such may
- Chapter II not have been really the case.

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CONCLUDING
q

REMARKS


q MODERN KAMA

SUTRA


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q TRANSLATOR'S
NOTES
- Preface
PART VI
- Introduction
CHAPTER IV
About a Reunion with a former Lover
q PART I:
INTRODUCTORY
- Chapter I
When a courtesan abandons her present lover after all his wealth is exhausted,
- Chapter II
she may then consider about her reunion with a former lover. But she should
- Chapter III
- Chapter IV return to him only if he has acquired fresh wealth, or is still wealthy, and if he is
- Chapter V still attached to her. And if this man be living at the time with some other
woman she should consider well before she acts.
q PART II: ON SEXUAL
UNION
Now such a man can only be in one of the six following conditions:
- Chapter I
- Chapter II
He may have left the first woman of his own accord, and may even have left
- Chapter III q

another woman since then.
- Chapter IV
q He may have been driven away from both women.
- Chapter V
q He may have left the one woman of her own accord, and been driven away
- Chapter VI
by the other.
- Chapter VII
q He may have left the one woman of his own accord, and be living with
- Chapter VIII
another woman.
- Chapter IX
q He may have been driven away from the one woman, and left the other of his
- Chapter X
own accord.

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