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like connect-the-dots, to draw freehand like a crayon, or even a combination
of the two. And, if you want shapes, hoo-boy! You can select stars, diamonds,
and lucky clovers (not really) from a drop-down menu. Simple!

What about adjusting those lines and shapes when you have drawn them?
That™s a bit trickier and involves adjusting things called nodes ” but we walk
you through that process in the next section ” never fear. After all, we™re
professionals: professional dummies.



Setting line and fill color
for lines and shapes
To determine how lines and outlines look, choose a foreground color, style,
or texture (or all of them) on the Color palette before creating the line or
shape. To determine how fills look (unless you™re making a single straight-line
segment, where fill doesn™t apply), choose a background material from the
Background Material box before creating the line or shape. (Remember that a
material is a combination of a color, pattern, or gradient and any textures you
choose to add to it.)

Note that for open shapes (a curvy line, for example), if you use fill, it fills the
area between the starting and ending points of the shape. In many such
cases, you may want to turn off background (fill) material altogether: Click
the Transparent button on the right side, just underneath the Background
Material box.

If you have already created a line or shape and want to change its appearance,
see the section “Changing Colors and Other Properties,” later in this chapter.



Drawing single lines and
connected line segments
To draw a straight (vector) line or a series of connected straight lines, click
the Pen tool on the Tools toolbar and then follow these steps:

1. Choose a foreground color, style, or texture (or all three).
Left-click the Foreground Material box on the Color palette. Refer to
Chapter 3 for more help.

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2. Set the mode to Drawing, as shown in Figure 12-4.
Press F4 to bring up the Tool Options palette if you don™t see it.


Figure 12-4:
Draw
The Tool
Knife point-to-point
Options mode using Bezier curves
palette for
the Pen tool;
if it doesn™t
look like
this, drag
the window
handle
Edit Draw Draw
down until
mode lines freehand
you see
and
everything.
polylines



3. Click the Draw Lines button from the Tool Options palette, as shown
in Figure 12-4.
4. Also on the Tool Options palette, set the Width value to the width (in
pixels) of the line you want.
All the Paint Shop Pro value boxes offer a nifty way to adjust them: Click
and hold the big down arrow on the right side of the value box and drag
left or right in the slider that appears.
You can also choose a line style (like dashes or barbed wire) for your
line at this time by choosing a style from the Line Style drop-down menu,
also on the Tool Options palette.
5. Enable the Connect Segments check box if you want to play connect-
the-dots: make multiple, connected straight lines.
Clear that check box to make separate lines.
6. Drag or click line end points.
If you want lines drawn at perfect 90-degree or 45-degree angles (perfect
horizontal, vertical, or diagonal lines), hold down the Shift key before
you drag or click, and Paint Shop Pro snaps your lines to the nine com-
pass points.

To move individual line segments, or move the points where line segments
connect, enable the Show Modes check box. Your line appears with square
dots (handles) around the perimeter. Drag the dots to move them. For more
flexibility in changing lines, see “Picking at Your Nodes,” later in this chapter.


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With all vector shapes, click the Apply button on the Tools toolbar after each
shape if you want that shape to be an independent object. Otherwise, objects
are all linked together even if they appear separate.



Drawing freehand lines or shapes
Freehand lines are basically any old scribble you want to make (or almost
so). Here™s how to scribble in high-technology land. Click the Pen tool on
the Tool toolbar, choose your color (together with any textures, patterns,
or gradients) from the material boxes, and then follow these steps:

1. On the Materials palette (press F6 if it™s not already visible), click the
Transparent button in the Background and Fill Properties box.
This step ensures that whatever shape you draw doesn™t get filled in like
a closed blob. If you want a filled shape, choose a material instead.
2. On the Tool Options palette (if the palette isn™t onscreen, press F4),
click the Draw Freehand button.
3. Also on the Tool Options palette, set the Width value to the width (in
pixels) of the line you want; also, set the line style and other options.
4. Drag any old way on your image.
5. If you want to turn your line into a shape (with a closed line), click the
Close Selected Open Contours button on the Tool Options palette
when you™re done.
6. If you want to start a new, unrelated line elsewhere on the canvas,
click Apply on the Tool Options palette. Otherwise, your lines are
visually separate but linked together.

Paint Shop Pro has this adorable habit of keeping everything you draw with
the Pen tool joined. Even if you draw a squiggle in one corner, start a new
contour, and then draw a loop on the other side of the screen, Paint Shop Pro
thinks of them as one big shape ” even if they™re not connected. If you want
to draw two entirely separate shapes so that you can apply separate fills and
strokes to them, make sure that you click the Apply button between shapes.

If you enable the Show Modes check box,, your line appears with square dots
(handles) around the perimeter. Drag any handle around the outside of the
rectangle to resize or reorient your line.

The line is a clever, automatically constructed, connect-the-dots line. If you
want to drag a line that follows your tight turns more smoothly, you need
dots that are closer together. For a line more obviously made up of line




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Chapter 12: Adding Layers of Text or Shapes

segments that connect dots, the dots need to be farther apart. On the Tool
Options palette, you can set that closeness by adjusting the Curve Tracking
value: smaller for closer dots and larger for more widely spaced dots.



Making curved lines
To make curved lines, you lay down a series of points where Paint Shop Pro
makes the line bend. Click the Pen tool on the Tools toolbar and ensure that
the Tool Options palette is visible (if it™s not, press F4).

On the Tool Options palette, click the Draw Point-to-Point Bezier Curve
button (which looks like a lumpy S on its side). To make just a single curve,
make sure that the Connect Segments check box is clear; to make curve after
curve, enable that check box.

You click to lay down the points, but don™t just click when you place your
dots ” click where you want the dot, and then keep your mouse button
down and drag a little. As you drag, you pull out an arrow by its tip. Your line
no longer bends sharply at the dot. Here™s how that arrow works for you:

As you drag the arrow longer, the curve gets broader at the dot. If you
make the arrow shorter again, the curve gets sharper at the dot.
When the arrow appears, you can release the mouse button and make
your adjustments by dragging either end of the arrow.
If you drag either end of the arrow around the dot, your line rotates to
stay parallel to the arrow where the line and arrow pass through the dot.

Figure 12-5 shows the effect of dragging the tip of the arrow. On the left, a
curved line is created and the arrow appears for the latest dot. On the right,
the arrow™s tip is being extended and dragged upward a bit. You can see how
the curve broadens and changes angle to follow the arrow™s direction.



Figure 12-5:
Making a
curved line.
On the right,
dragging the
arrow™s tip
to adjust
the curve.




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Adding shapes
Need a square? Need a star? The Paint Shop Pro shapes tool group lets you
choose from a wide range of predetermined shapes, including circles, rectan-
gles, stars, triangles, and cool icons.

In the margin appears the one tool, Preset Shapes, that can deliver any shape
known to Paint Shop Pro. The Preset Shapes tool lives with three of its more
specialized cousins in the tool group that is third from the bottom on the
Tools toolbar (refer to Figure 12-1). These other cousins (Rectangle, Ellipse,
and Symmetrical Shape) are really just convenient shortcuts to access com-
monly used shapes. Use them if you like ” they work similarly. We discuss
only Preset Shapes here.

Preset shapes are normally vector objects (as are text, lines, and arbitrary
shapes). If you prefer them as raster (normal, bitmap) objects, make sure
that the Vector option box is cleared on the Tool Options palette. If you
create any vector object, it must be on a vector layer. If your active layer isn™t
a vector layer, Paint Shop Pro adds a vector layer for you and places the
shape there.

If you like, you can edit the shapes of preset shapes after you have placed
them in your image. Follow the instructions in the section “Picking at Your
Nodes,” later in this chapter.

When you™re done adding preset shapes and you want to work on other parts
of the image, you may need to change to another layer ” probably the back-
ground layer. Otherwise, refer to Chapter 11 for the skinny.



Dragging a shape
The Preset Shapes tool can deliver a shape from its library of shapes in any
size, proportion, color, gradient, pattern, or texture you like! Like text and
drawn shapes in Paint Shop Pro, preset shapes have two parts: the outline
and the fill. Follow these steps:

1. Click the Preset Shapes tool on the Tools toolbar.
2. If you want your shape to have an outline, do the following:
On the Materials palette (press F6), click the Foreground and Stroke
Properties box and choose a color from the dialog box that pops up. For
a gradient or patterned outline, switch to the appropriate tab; refer to
Chapter 10 for help on how to set gradients, patterns, or textures.




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Chapter 12: Adding Layers of Text or Shapes

On the Tool Options palette, set the value in the Width dialog box to the
width of the outline you want, in pixels. For example, for an outline 4
pixels wide, set it to 4.
If you want to use a styled outline (like arrows or dashes) to surround
your shape rather than a solid line, choose a custom line from the drop-
down Line Style menu, also on the Tool Options palette.
If you want no outline, click the Transparent button on the right side
underneath the Background Material box.
3. Select a fill for your shape.
Click the Background and Fill Properties box and choose a color from
the dialog box that pops up. For a gradient or patterned outline, switch
to the appropriate tab; refer to Chapter 3 for help on how to set gradi-
ents, patterns, or textures.
If you don™t want your shape filled (that is, you want just the outline of a
shape), click the Transparent button on the right side underneath the
Foreground and Stroke Properties box.
4. On the Tool Options palette, click the down arrow next to the Shapes
preview box and choose a shape in the gallery of preset shapes that
appears.
The Tool Options palette and its gallery of shapes appear.
5. If you want to use the colors, styles, and textures you chose in Steps 1
and 2, make sure that the Retain Style check box is unchecked on the
Tool Options palette.
Otherwise, if that box is checked, Paint Shop Pro uses the colors, line
width, and other properties of the original shape that is stored in the
shape library.
6. Drag diagonally on your image.
As you drag, your chosen shape appears and expands. (The colors and
other style attributes don™t appear until you release the mouse button.)
If you drag more horizontally than vertically, the shape is flattened.
Likewise, dragging more vertically gives you a skinny shape. Hold down
the Shift key as you click and drag to create a shape with the original
proportions that™s not skinny or fat.
When you release the mouse button, your shape appears fully colored and
filled according to your choices. The shape appears within the usual Paint
Shop Pro object selection frame, which means that you can redimension
the shape by dragging any of the handles (squares) around the edge of
that frame. To rotate your shape, drag the handle at the end of the arm
that sticks out from the center of the frame. A star is born: Figure 12-6
shows the various elements we have discussed in the preceding steps.




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Figure 12-6:
A star is
born, using
the Preset
Shapes tool.
Because
the Retain
Style check
box is
cleared on
the Tool
Options
palette, the
outline and
fill chosen
on the
Handles Click here to rotate.
Materials
palette
apply.




Picking at Your Nodes
Paint Shop Pro users have an old saying: “You can pick your friends and you
can pick your nodes, but you can™t pick your friend™s nodes.” It™s not true, of
course, but that doesn™t keep users from saying it. You can freely pick, or pick
at, all your nodes ” including your friend™s nodes, if that person gives you a
Paint Shop Pro file with vector lines or shapes in it.

If you want to alter a shape or a line after you have drawn it, you need to get
down and dirty and start changing the nodes. Nodes are the dots that Paint
Shop Pro plays connect-the-dots with to create lines and shapes; you can
move nodes, remove them, or change how the line passes through them.

To start fiddling with nodes, you need to select the Pen tool and click the Edit
Mode button on the Tool Options palette (right under the word Mode).

When you have the Pen tool selected, even if you™re not in Node Edit mode,
enable the Show Nodes check box and you still have node-editing options
available. This redundancy is nice, but makes a fine distinction between Edit
mode and Draw mode generally a little fuzzy to the casual user ” or even to
the writers of Dummies books, for that matter. You can tell that you can edit
nodes if you can see the nodes (tiny squares) along the line. Also, your
cursor turns solid black, and the nodes turn black when you click them.



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Chapter 12: Adding Layers of Text or Shapes

To enter Node Edit mode, follow these steps:

1. Select the Pen tool.
2. On the Tool Options palette, click the Edit mode button.

After you™re in Edit mode, you can manipulate your nodes all you want. Here
are some changes you can make:

To select a node for any action (like deleting, dragging, or changing its
type), click it. You know that you can select it when a 4-headed arrow
appears under the cursor; you know that a node is selected when it™s
solid black.
To move a node, drag it. You can move multiple nodes at one time as
long as they™re all selected.
To delete a node, press Delete.
To select several nodes, hold down the Shift key while clicking them.
To select several nodes at one time, make sure that you™re in Node Edit
mode (this action doesn™t work if you™re in Drawing or Knife mode) and
draw a square around the nodes you want to select.
To select all nodes, right-click a node and choose Edit➪Select All from
the context menu that pops up.
To join two line segments that are part of the same object (for example,
if they were created by cutting a line in half with the Pen tool in Knife
mode), select the two ends you want to join by Shift+clicking both of
them and then right-click your image and choose Edit➪Join.

If your vector shape is the only vector layer in your image, you may be able
to select nodes in it, regardless of which layer you™re in ” which is a direct
reversal of everything we have told you in all the other layer sections. (Paint
Shop Pro loves to make us look foolish.) However, if you have more than one
vector layer in an image, you can select nodes from only the vector object
you have selected. For more information on what these layers are, look to
Chapter 11.

Note that a line has direction, based on the order in which you create the
line. The control arrow that appears on a node in Node Edit mode points
in the line™s direction. The word Start or End that appears when you pause
your mouse cursor over end nodes of a line also tells you the direction. A
few things you do may be dependent on direction, such as aligning text to
the line or shape.




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Slicing Alongside Your Nodes
The Pen tool is mightier than the Sword tool ” or would be, if a Sword tool
existed. Ironically, though, Knife mode is a part of the Pen tool, and it™s might-
ier than the rest of the Pen tool, by slicing in half the lines and shapes you
have drawn.

Select Knife mode from the Tool Options palette and drag a line through your
vector object. This action separates your object into two separate sets of
nodes, cut cleanly where you drew through them with the knife. Be warned
that even if you separate an image in two with the knife, both still count as
one vector object.

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