<< . .

. 8
( : 8)






6. Long-term studies by groups such as the MacArthur Foundation and
ton University in St. Louis used functional brain imaging to follow the
the International Longevity Center at Mount Sinai Hospital in New
amount of brain activity in different areas when subjects were asked to come
York City reveal that individuals who are most successful at coping with
up with a verb to go with a list of new nouns. When first presented with a
aging and have maintained the best-preserved mental capacities are those
novel list, large areas of the cortex lit up, showing increased levels of brain ac-
who have active social and intellectual networks. Similarly, a three-year
tivity in several distinct areas of the cortex. After fifteen minutes of practice,
study conducted at the University of Southern California showed that
when the task had become routine and automatic, activity in those same ar-
people in their seventies who stayed physically and socially active retained
eas returned to baseline levels. If the subjects were then given a new list, ro-
their mental faculties much better than individuals who didn't. See Suc-
bust activity returned. These researchers also concluded that the brain uses
cessful Aging by Drs. John W. Rowe and Robert L. Kahn for summaries of
different areas to generate novel responses and automatic (rote) tasks.
these and other similar positive findings.
4. For a more detailed discussion see: Dr. John Allman, "Tracing the
Brain's Pathways for Linking Emotion and Reason," New York Times, De-
cember 6,1994.

5. Research by Anthony Damasio and Ralph Adolphs at the University of
Iowa has shown how dramatically emotions can enhance memories. The
researchers showed a group of people a series of photographs with a sim-
ple story about a father taking his daughter to the zoo. Weeks later, when
the same people were asked to recount the story, they could recall it only
in the vaguest terms. They couldn't remember if it was a son or a daugh-
ter. . .whether she was a blonde or brunette”or even precisely where they
were headed. When the scientists changed the emotional quality of the
story and pictures to one in which a father takes his daughter to the zoo
and she is hit by a car while crossing the road, the memory of the narra-
tive was vastly improved.




145
144
ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Lawrence C. Katz is the James B. Duke Professor of Neuro-
biology at Duke University Medical Center and an Investiga-
tor in the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. A graduate of
the University of Chicago, Dr. Katz was a post-doctoral fellow
at Rockefeller University, where he worked with Nobel laure-
ate Dr. Torsten Wiesel. He is an internationally recognized ex-
pert on the development and function of the mammalian
cortex. His recent research focusing on neurotrophins and
their effect on nerve cell growth has received widespread
recognition in the scientific community and led to the concep-
tual foundation of this book. Dr. Katz has published over fifty
original scientific articles and has received numerous profes-
sional awards for his research. In addition to his lab work on
the brain, he exercises his brain by flying and fly-fishing. He
lives in Durham, North Carolina, with his wife and children.


IVlanning Rubin, who comes from a long line of writers, has
spent most of his career writing in the communications and
advertising fields for major firms like Grey and J. Walter


147
KEEP YOUR RAIN ALIVE




Thompson, as well as running his own movie advertising
company. As volunteer Creative Director for The Anti-
Defamation League, he has created and consulted on scores
of public service ads. A Phi Beta Kappa from the University
of Richmond and Johns Hopkins, Manning Rubin is
presently stretching his brain as a Senior Creative Supervisor
at K2 Design, a leading interactive marketing agency in New
York's thriving silicon alley. His book 60 Ways to Relieve Stress
in 60 Seconds was also published by Workman. He lives in
New York City with his wife, Jane.




For news, views, and questions
about keeping your brain active and healthy,
visit: www. keepyourbrainalive. com.




148

<< . .

. 8
( : 8)