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Use this method when you want to retain a copy of the document in a Document Library
while collaborating on it in a Shared Workspace. You can work behind the scenes on a
document using this method and then publish the final, completed document back to the
original Document Library. To publish a document in a Shared Workspace back to its
original Document Library, select Publish to Source Location from the drop-down menu in
the Name column associated with that file in the Shared Workspace. Users can open the
document from the workspace and work with it as if were saved on their machines. Users
will need to open and then save the document to have their own local copy of the document
that is dynamically linked to the copy in the Shared Workspace.
To create a Shared Workspace from an existing document in Word, Excel, or PowerPoint,
follow these steps:
1. Open the file in its associated application.
2. From the Tools menu in Word, Excel, or PowerPoint, select Shared Workspace to
display the Shared Workspace task pane. If a task pane is already visible in the
application, you can simply select Shared Workspace from the drop-down menu at
the top right of that task pane.
3. In the Document Workspace Name section of the Shared Workspace pane, change
the name for the new Document Workspace if you desire. This field will already
contain the name of the open file.
4. In the Location for New Workspace section of the Shared Workspace pane, use the
drop-down menu to select the SharePoint site where the Document Workspace will
be created or enter the location of the SharePoint site.
5. Click the Create button in the Shared Workspace pane.
Use this method when you want to create a Shared Workspace from an existing supported
Office 2003 file type and have your own local copy of the file dynamically linked to the
copy in the Shared Workspace. Other users of the Shared Workspace will need to visit the
workspace and open and save the file to have their own local copies.
Chapter 17 ¦ Windows SharePoint Services with Office System 413

To create a Shared Workspace using Outlook, follow these steps:
1. Create a new e-mail message in Outlook addressed to yourself and others you want
to collaborate with on the document. Users can be added in the To, CC, or BCC
fields.
2. Attach the file you want to use as the basis of the Shared Workspace via the Insert
File paperclip icon in the Outlook toolbar.
3. If the Attachment Options pane is not displayed in Outlook, display it by selecting
the Attachment Options button to the right of the attached file.
4. Select the Shared Attachments option in the Attachment Options pane.
5. In the Create Document Workspace At text box, use the drop-down arrow to select
a SharePoint server to create the workspace on. You can also simply enter the
location of the SharePoint server.
6. Choose the account you want to send the e-mail from and click the Send button in
Outlook to send the e-mail.
Outlook creates a Shared Workspace on the specified server of the same name as the
attached file and sends a hyperlink to the workspace in the sent e-mail. If the attached file
is a Word, Excel, or PowerPoint file, the copy of the file received by the recipient is
linked directly to the newly created Shared Workspace. The recipient can save and work
on the file locally and synchronize changes with the copy stored in the Shared
Workspace. Use this method when you want to create a Shared Workspace and distribute
a copy of the document dynamically linked to the copy in the workspace.
Regardless of which method you use to create a Shared Workspace, the file is available
in the workspace to all users with appropriate access permissions. Users can
simultaneously open and work on a document in a Shared Workspace and update the
copy they are working on with the centrally stored copy in the workspace.

Working with Shared Workspaces inside
Office 2003 applications
Now that you have some familiarity with Document Libraries and Shared Workspaces, and
understand how to create them, you can focus exclusively on document collaboration from
solely within supported Office 2003 applications. Although Document Libraries support
collaboration, this section focuses on using a Shared Workspace. From the applications
covered in this book, Word, Excel, and PowerPoint support the Shared Workspace task pane
with the capability to not only create a Shared Workspace but to also work with the Shared
Workspace from within the Shared Workspace task pane.

Some Office 2003 applications not covered in this book also utilize the Shared Workspace task
Note pane. The skills you learn here to work with the Shared Workspace task pane can be applied to
any Office 2003 application that implements it.
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414

Figure 17-10 shows the Shared Workspace task pane, displayed in Word, for a local copy of
a document that is linked to a shared copy in a Shared Workspace.




Figure 17-10: You can create and manage a Shared Workspace using the Shared
Workspace task pane.

Regardless of whether you are collaborating on a Word, Excel, or PowerPoint file, the
options and tabs in the Shared Workspace task pane are the same.
Before taking a closer look at how to work with the Shared Workspace task pane, let™s
consider the updating of linked files saved locally when you open and close them and
discuss how to deal with conflicts between local file copies and those on the server.
The first thing you might notice when opening a local copy of a document linked to a central
copy in a Shared Workspace is that the Office 2003 application will ask you whether you
want to check the Shared Workspace for updates to the document. You can choose from
among any of the following options:
Chapter 17 ¦ Windows SharePoint Services with Office System 415

¦ Update. Selecting Update immediately checks the Shared Workspace for updates to
the document. If changes are made to the local copy that is in conflict with changes
made to the central copy, you are prompted to review and resolve the conflicts.
Selecting Yes opens the Document Updates pane from which you can choose to
merge copies, open the workspace copy for comparison, or select one copy to
replace the other.

If, at any time, SharePoint detects conflicts between a local copy and the copy in the Shared
Workspace, those conflicts can be resolved via the Document Updates task pane. When con-
Note
flicts between copies exist, they are reported in the Status tab (the first tab) of the Shared
Workspace pane. The content of and options available in the Document Updates pane depends
on the current status of conflicts between documents. Use of the Document Updates task pane,
when required, is pretty much self-explanatory.

¦ Don™t Update. If you select this option, the document remains linked to the central
copy but many of the Shared Workspace task pane tabs that require a connection
with the server are unpopulated. The Office 2003 application will not then
periodically check the server to determine whether any updates are available. Select
Don™t Update at those times when you want to solely work on a local copy of the
file for a period of time or when the SharePoint site that hosts the file is
inaccessible or access to it is slow. At any time, you can manually check for
updates by pressing the Update button at the bottom of the Shared Workspace task
pane. This will reconnect the local copy to the workspace copy and repopulate
empty tabs in the Shared Workspace pane.
¦ Don™t Ask Again. Selecting this disconnects the file from the Shared Workspace,
thereby removing any link between the local copy of the document and the copy on
the Shared Workspace. Select this only if you are certain you want to unlink the
two copies and not receive any further document updates. If you choose this option
and later want to receive updates to the document, you might need to visit the
Shared Workspace and save a new linked copy of the file to your computer. You
might then need to merge any changes you have made to the local file into the
newly saved and linked file.
When you close the local copy of a linked file, you are presented with only the option to
update the workspace copy with your changes. If conflicts between copies are determined,
you can resolve them using the Document Updates task pane.
You can control how the Office 2003 application checks for updates on opening and closing
the document and the period of automatic update checking via the Options button at the
bottom of the Shared Workspace task pane. Options include the capability to automatically
update on opening and closing (and thereby disable any dialog box prompts) and to globally
turn off automatic updating.
To demonstrate how to use the Shared Workspace task pane, this section works through an
example. In this case, an existing Word document is used. This document can be opened
directly from a Shared Workspace or from a local copy linked to a Shared Workspace.
Remember that the same techniques also apply to Excel and PowerPoint.
Part II ¦ Collaborating and Integrating with Office 2003
416


The following operations assume you are working with an open document linked to a Shared
Workspace and that the Shared Workspace task pane is displayed. The document can be
Note
opened directly from the workspace or can be a local copy of the document that is linked to the
workspace. If the Shared Workspace task pane is not displayed, display it via Tools_Shared
Workspace in the application™s main menu.

First, you need to assign members to the Shared Workspace.
To assign members to a Shared Workspace, follow these steps:
1. Select the Members tab in the Shared Workspace task pane.
2. From towards the bottom of the Members tab, select Add New Members to open
the new Add New Members dialog box.
3. In the Choose Members section of the Add New Members dialog box, enter the e-
mail address or usernames of the new members separated by a semicolon.
4. In the Choose Site Group section of the Add New Members dialog box, select the
group you want those new members to be assigned to. If you want to assign new
members to different site groups, you need to add those new members individually.
5. Select Next and then, in the new dialog box that opens, select Finish.

If SharePoint cannot properly identify any users you are trying to add with the host server, you
might be presented with the requirement to enter additional information or to correct existing
Note
information after pressing Next in Step 5. If then, after pressing Finish and confirming that you
do indeed have the correct details entered, you are presented with a new dialog box stating that
the usernames are not valid, you should contact your SharePoint administrator to determine
whether the users you are trying to add have access to the SharePoint site.

6. In the next new dialog box that opens, you can choose to send an e-mail to the
newly added members. To send an e-mail to the new members informing them of
their new membership and their workspace™s location, ensure the Send E-Mail
Invitation to the New Members checkbox is checked.
7. Click OK.
The E-Mail All Members option at the bottom of the Members tab of the Shared Workspace
task pane allows you to send an e-mail to all members at once.
Members are grouped into categories in the Members tab of the Shared Workspace task
pane according to whether they are Online or Offline; you are listed separately at the top of
that pane.
Figure 17-11 shows the Members tab of the Shared Workspace task pane with newly added
members.
Chapter 17 ¦ Windows SharePoint Services with Office System 417




Figure 17-11: Use the Members tab to manage and communicate
with workspace members.

You can use the drop-down arrow at the right of the member entry (shown in Figure 17-11
but not expanded) to manage Shared Workspace members. Among the options available,
you can choose to remove the member, edit the member™s group membership, send an
Instant Message to the member (provided that member and you are online), add a member to
Messenger Contacts, edit the member™s user information, schedule a meeting with the
member using Outlook, and add the member to your Outlook Contacts. Additional actions
are available. Explore the Member-entry menu to see which options are available to you.
The online/offline status of members is refreshed when you select the Update button at the
bottom of the Shared Workspace task pane.
Now that you have added members to your Shared Workspace and are aware of how to
manage your members, you™re ready to assign tasks and work with assigned tasks.
To assign a task to a Shared Workspace member, follow these steps:
1. Select the Tasks tab in the Shared Workspace task pane.
2. Select Add New Task from the Tasks tab to open the new Task dialog box.
3. In the Task dialog box, enter a Title, Status, Priority, and a task Description, and
assign the Task as shown in Figure 17-12. Only a Title is compulsory.
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Figure 17-12: Create, use, and assign tasks with the Tasks tab.

4. Select OK.
Completed tasks are displayed with a green tick in the checkbox next to the task in the task
tab of the Shared Workspace pane, whereas tasks not yet started are shown with no fill in
that checkbox. Tasks with any other status are shown with a partly filled checkbox. High
Priority tasks are also marked with a red exclamation mark. You can mark a task as complete
or change the status of a task from complete to incomplete by selecting the checkbox next to
that Task.
You can open the Task dialog box to edit a task simply by double-clicking the task in the
Task tab of the Shared Workspace pane. Alternatively, open the task for editing via the menu
available to the right of the task when that task is selected. This menu also contains options
to delete a task and to create an alert about a task. The capability to create an alert for a task
is also available at the bottom of the Task pane. All options that are available to you when
you create a task are available when you edit the task provided you have adequate
permissions in the Shared Workspace.
Now that you know how to assign tasks, you™re ready to learn how to work with documents
and folders using the Shared Workspace pane.
To add a new document to a Shared Workspace, follow these steps:
1. Select the Documents tab in the Shared Workspace pane.
2. From the bottom of the Documents tab, select Add New Document.
3. In the new Add New Document dialog box, use the Browse button to select a file to
upload. Only single files can be selected. To link the newly uploaded documents to
the local copy of that document ensure the Make Workspace Updates Available
When I Open My Copy checkbox is selected.
4. Press OK.
Chapter 17 ¦ Windows SharePoint Services with Office System 419

To create a new folder, simply select Add New Folder in Step 2, enter the folder name in
the Add New Folder dialog box, and press OK. To view the contents of a folder, click it or
select View Contents from the menu available to the right of that folder. You can also
delete a folder and its contents via the available menu on the right of its entry. Be sure you
don™t delete a folder without first checking that it doesn™t contain important files. To
return to the main view after a folder is in its contents view simply select the folder again.
Documents are added to a folder using the same method as before, but with that folder™s
contents in view.
The menu available to the right of a documents entry in the Documents pane allows you
to delete the document or to obtain an alert when changes are made to the document.
Alerts are also available via the Alert Me About Documents link at the bottom of the
Documents pane. When a document is not the currently open document, the menu to the
left of that document allows you to open the document in its associated application. You
can also open a document in its associated application by clicking its entry in the
Documents pane.
Entries in the Tasks tab are refreshed when you press the Update button at the bottom of the
Shared Workspace pane.
You can easily add links to the Shared Workspace by using the Links tab of the Shared
Workspace pane. Links are added by selecting the Add New Link hyperlink from the bottom
of the Links pane, entering the location, description, and any Notes relevant to the link in the
new Link dialog box, and then pressing OK. From the menu available to the right of the link
in the Links tab, you can choose to edit or delete the link or to receive an alert when that
item is changed.
The Document information tab in the Shared Workspace displays information about the
currently open document. From the Alert me link towards the bottom of the Document
information tab you can choose to receive an e-mail alert when changes are made to the item
or when Web discussions on the item have changed.
The Restrict Permissions link towards the bottom of the Document information tab allows
you to set permissions on the file in the same way that you can via the Permissions button on
the standard toolbar.
You can open, restore, delete, and view comments for versions of the document stored in the
Shared Workspace via the Version History link at the bottom of the Information tab of the
Shared Workspace pane. Versioning can be enabled via the Modify Settings for Document
Versions link in the new Versions Saved For dialog box that opens after selecting the
Version History link. The Version History is also accessible via File_Versions_In a
Document Library from the standard toolbar.
Figure 17-13 shows the Versions Saved For dialog box opened from the Version History link
in the Information tab in the Shared Workspace pane in Word.
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Figure 17-13: Enable and work with versions via the Document Information tab.

To open, restore, delete, or view comments on a document version, simply select that
version in the Versions Saved for dialog box, choose the appropriate action from the options
available on the right, and respond appropriately to any subsequent prompts. Restoring a
document does not delete it but, instead, makes it the current and active available document.
You cannot restore or delete the currently open and active document. Use the Open button to
view the contents of document versions prior to deleting or restoring them unless comments
you have added to the version adequately describe that version.
Comments can be added to a document only when it is checked in. To check in a document
you, naturally, need to have first checked it out. Checking out a document, as covered
previously, provides a long-term lock on the file that prevents others from making changes
to it while you want to work on it. The Check Out and alternate Check In links in the
Document Information tab of the Shared Workspace pane are available only when you are
working with a writeable copy of the file opened directly from the Shared Workspace.

Tip
Check the Status tab (the first tab of the Shared Workspace pane) to determine whether a
document has been checked out and to whom it is checked out.

To check out a document, follow these steps:
1. Open the document from the Shared Workspace by clicking it.
2. If the document opens as a read-only file, select the Save button on the standard
toolbar and select Save in the new Save As dialog box to overwrite the Workspace
copy. This makes the currently open file writeable. This then makes Check Out and
the alternate Check In available in the Document Information tab of the Shared
Workspace task pane. If a Word document was opened from the Workspace in
Reading Layout, for editing purposes, select the Close button on the standard Word
toolbar to change to your preferred editing layout.
3. Select the Check Out link from the bottom of the Document Information pane (see
Figure 17-13).
Chapter 17 ¦ Windows SharePoint Services with Office System 421

To check a document back in and add comments to it, select the Check In link from the
bottom of the Document Information pane, add your comments in the new Check In
Comments dialog box, and then select OK.
A checked-out document can also be checked in, and comments added, when the file is
closed. When closing a checked-out document that is opened directly from a Shared
Workspace, you are prompted to check in the file, keep the file checked out, or to discard
changes and undo the check out. Respond accordingly to your requirements at that time.

To provide a lock on a copy of a document in a Shared Workspace while you work on a local
copy of that file that is linked to the workspace copy, you need to visit the workspace using
Note
Internet Explorer and check out the document using the menu available to the right of that file.
The file remains synchronized to the workspace copy, but only you can make changes that can
be updated to the workspace copy. When you want to check the file back in, simply visit the
workspace again and use the same menu to, this time, check the file in. Comments can then be
added to the file version in the Check In Web page in Internet Explorer.


SharePoint as a Central Contacts
and Calendar Server
Two of the useful features available with Windows SharePoint Services are the capability to
act as a central server for calendars and contacts. You can maintain a central database of
contacts and events that can be linked directly to Outlook and are accessible by anyone with
access to the Contacts and Events folders on the SharePoint site. These features, although
not as powerful as those available with Microsoft Exchange, provide an alternative to
comparable Exchange features when that server is not available.
Linking a SharePoint Events folder (which is essentially a calendar) to Outlook is
particularly useful when you want to compare events in the SharePoint calendar with
another calendar in your Outlook profile.
Figure 17-14 shows a linked SharePoint calendar opened side by side with an Outlook
calendar. Multiple SharePoint calendars can also be opened side by side for comparison.
Part II ¦ Collaborating and Integrating with Office 2003
422




Figure 17-14: View a SharePoint calendar in Outlook

In Figure 17-14, my girlfriend has access to a SharePoint events folder and uses it to remind
me of certain appointments I am “required” to do. You can use this feature for many
imaginable scenarios. Perhaps you want to maintain a SharePoint calendar of company
meetings and events and make that available to all employees from within Outlook.
SharePoint calendars are listed in the Other Calendars section of the Calendar view in the
Outlook Navigation pane. Linked SharePoint calendars are cached for offline use in Outlook
when the SharePoint server is inaccessible. To view a linked SharePoint calendar in
Outlook, simply select its checkbox in Other Calendars. When connected to the SharePoint
server, you can refresh the SharePoint calendar by deselecting and then selecting its entry in
Other Calendars.
Linking a SharePoint Events folder to Outlook (regardless of where it is located on the
SharePoint server), and therefore making its information available in Outlook, is as easy as
opening that Events folder in Internet Explorer, selecting the Link To Outlook link in the top
bar of that folder™s view, and selecting Yes when you receive the prompt from Outlook to
add it.
SharePoint calendars are opened in Outlook as read-only. You need to edit the SharePoint
calendar and add events at the SharePoint site. You can, however, add events from the
SharePoint calendar to your default Outlook from within Outlook. The reverse,
unfortunately, doesn™t apply.
Chapter 17 ¦ Windows SharePoint Services with Office System 423

To add an event from a SharePoint calendar opened in Outlook to your default Outlook
calendar, open the calendars side by side and drag and drop the event from the SharePoint
calendar to the Outlook one. You can drag and drop the event into any time slot you choose.

You might need to compensate for differing time zones when adding events from the linked
Tip
SharePoint calendar to one of your other available non-SharePoint calendars. Check with your
SharePoint administrator to determine the time zone used on the SharePoint server.

To remove a linked Calendars folder from Other Calendars, right-click its entry in Other
Calendars and select Remove from Other Calendars.

Making SharePoint contacts available to Outlook
The integration of SharePoint with Outlook also includes the capability to open a SharePoint
Contacts folder as a read-only Contacts folder in Outlook and the capability to import
Outlook contacts into a SharePoint Contacts folder. This is particularly useful when you
want to maintain a shared, central global address list accessible from Outlook to all who
have access to the SharePoint Contacts folder. You can add contacts from your Outlook
address book to the SharePoint Contacts folder and make them available to all others with
access to the SharePoint Contacts folder. SharePoint Contacts folders that are linked to
Outlook can be made available in the Outlook address book and are also available to
Outlook as an address list for checking purposes when Outlook sends e-mail. Linked
SharePoint contacts are cached in Outlook so the information is available offline or when the
server is not accessible.
SharePoint Contacts folders that are linked to Outlook are opened as read-only, and,
therefore, you have to edit the SharePoint Contacts folder at the SharePoint server. You can
drag and drop the contacts from the linked SharePoint Contacts folder to other non-
SharePoint Outlook Contact folders.
To import Outlook contacts into a SharePoint Contacts folder, follow these steps:
1. Connect to the SharePoint site in Internet Explorer.
2. Locate and then open the Contacts folder by clicking its entry. In the case of the
default SharePoint Contacts folder, the link to the folder is found in the Quick
Links section of the main SharePoint Home Page.
3. Select the Import Contacts link in the top bar of the Contacts Web page to open the
Select Users to Import dialog box. This dialog box is a representation of the
Outlook address book.

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