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Some action buttons are best placed on the Slide Master, such as Next and Previous; others,
such as Return, are special-use buttons that are best placed on individual slides.

2. Choose Slide Show_Action Buttons. A palette of buttons appears, corresponding
to the buttons you saw in Table 21-1. See Figure 21-2.




Figure 21-2: Choose a button from the Slide Show menu.
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3. Click the button that you want to place. Your mouse pointer turns into a crosshair.

Tip You can drag the Action Buttons palette off the Slide Show menu, making it into a floating
toolbar.

4. To create a button of a specific size, drag on the slide (or Slide Master) where you
want it to go. Or, to create a button of a default size, simply click once where you
want it. You can resize the button at any time later, the same as you can any object.

If you are going to place several buttons, and you want them all to be the same size, place them
Tip
at the default size to begin with. Then select them all, and resize them as a group. That way
they will all be exactly the same size.

5. The Action Settings dialog box appears. Make sure the Mouse Click tab is on top.
See Figure 21-3.




Figure 21-3: Specify what should happen when you click the action button.

6. Confirm or change the hyperlink set up there:
• If the action button should take the reader to a specific location, make sure the
correct slide appears in the Hyperlink To box. Refer to the right column in Table
21-1 to see the default setting for each action button. Table 21-2 lists the choices
you can make and what they do.
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• If the action button should run a program, choose Run program and enter the
program™s name and path, or click Browse to locate it. For example, you could
open a Web browser window from an action button. The executable file that runs
Internet Explorer is iexplore.exe.
• If the action button should play a sound, click None in the Action on Click
section, make sure the Play Sound check box is marked, and choose the correct
sound from the Play Sound drop-down list (or pick a different sound file by
choosing Other Sound).

You can also run macros with action buttons. This is not all that common, however, because
Tip most of the macros you record in PowerPoint apply to building a presentation, not showing one.
For example, you might create a macro that formats text a certain way. You would almost never
need to format text while a presentation was being shown to an audience.

7. Click OK. The button has been assigned the action you specified.
8. Add more action buttons as desired by repeating these steps.
9. If you are working in Slide Master view, exit it by clicking the Close button.
10. Test your action buttons in Slide Show view to make sure they jump where you
want them to.
To edit a button™s action, right-click it and choose Action Settings to reopen this dialog box
at any time.

Table 21-2
Hyperlink to Choices in the Action Settings Dialog Box
Drop-Down
Menu Choice Result
Previous Slide
Next Slide
First Slide
Last Slide
Last Slide Viewed These choices all do just what their names say. These are the
default actions assigned to certain buttons you learned about in
Table 21-1.

End Show Sets the button to stop the show when clicked.

Custom Show . . . Opens a Link to Custom Show dialog box, where you can
choose a custom show to jump to when the button is clicked.

Slide . . . Opens a Hyperlink to Slide dialog box, where you can choose
any slide in the current presentation to jump to when the button
is clicked.

Continued
Chapter 21 ¦ Designing User-Interactive PowerPoint Presentations 499


Table 21-2 (continued)
Drop-Down
Menu Choice Result

URL . . . Opens a Hyperlink to URL dialog box, where you can enter a
Web address to jump to when the button is clicked.

Other PowerPoint
Presentation . . . Opens a Hyperlink to Other PowerPoint Presentation dialog box,
where you can choose another PowerPoint presentation to
display when the button is clicked.

Other File . . . Opens a Hyperlink to Other File dialog box, where you can
choose any file to open when the button is clicked. If the file
requires a certain application, that application will open when
needed. (To run another application without opening a specific
file in it, use the Run Program option in the Action Settings
dialog box instead of Hyperlink To.)



Adding text to an action button
The blank action button you saw in Table 21-1 can be very useful. You can place several of
them on a slide and then type text into them, creating your own set of buttons.
To type text into a blank button, follow these steps:
1. Place a blank action button on the slide.
2. Right-click the action button and choose Add Text. An insertion point appears in it.
(You can also select the button and simply start typing.)
3. Type your text. Format it as desired using the normal text formatting commands
and buttons.
4. When you are finished, click outside of the button to stop.
5. Resize the button, if needed, to contain the text more neatly. You can drag a
button™s side selection handles to make it wider.
6. If you need to edit the text later, simply click the text to move the insertion point
back into it, just as you do with any text box.
Figure 21-4 shows some examples of custom buttons you can create with your own text.
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Figure 21-4: You can create any of these sets of action buttons by typing and formatting
text on blank buttons.


Creating your own action buttons
You can create an action button out of any object on your slide: a drawn shape, a piece of
clip art, a photograph, a text box ” anything. To do so, just right-click the object and
choose Action Settings. Then, set it to Hyperlink To, Run Program, or Play Sound, just as
you did for the action buttons in the preceding sections.
Make sure you clearly label the object that you are using as an action button so that the users
will know what they are getting when they click it. You can add text to the object directly
(for example, with an AutoShape), or you can add a text box next to the button that explains
its function.


Adding Text-Based Hyperlinks to Slides
Now that you know that hyperlinks are the key to user interactivity, you will want to add
some to your presentation. You can start with text-based hyperlinks since they™re the easiest.
You can either add them bare or with explanatory text.
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Typing a bare hyperlink
The most basic kind of hyperlink is an Internet address, typed directly into a text box. When
you enter text in any of the following formats, PowerPoint automatically converts it to a
hyperlink:
¦ Web addresses: Anything that begins with http://.
¦ E-mail addresses: Any string of characters with no spaces and an @ sign in the
middle somewhere.
¦ FTP addresses: Anything that begins with ftp://.
Figure 21-5 shows some examples of these “bare” hyperlinks. They are called bare because
you see what™s underneath them ” the actual address ” right there on the surface. There is
no friendly “click here” text that the link hides behind. For example, the text
support@microsoft.com is a hyperlink that sends e-mail to that address. In contrast, a
link that reads “Click here to send e-mail to me” and contains the same hyperlink address is
not bare, because you do not see the address directly.

If PowerPoint does not automatically create hyperlinks, the feature may be disabled. Choose
Note
Tools_AutoCorrect Options. Click the AutoFormat As You Type tab, and make sure the Internet
and network paths with hyperlinks checkbox is marked.




Figure 21-5: Some examples of bare Internet hyperlinks.
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You do not have to do anything special to create these hyperlinks; when you type them and
press Enter or the space bar, PowerPoint converts them to hyperlinks. You know the
conversion has taken place because the text becomes underlined and different-colored. (The
exact color depends on the color scheme in use.)

FTP stands for File Transfer Protocol. It™s a method of transferring files via the Internet. Up
until a few years ago, FTP was a totally separate system from the Web, but nowadays,
Note
most Web browsers have FTP download capabilities built in, so anyone who has
a Web browser can receive files via FTP. However, to send files via FTP, the user must
have a separate FTP program.


Creating text hyperlinks
A text hyperlink is a hyperlink comprised of text, but not just the bare address. For
example, in Figure 21-1, “Click here to learn more” is a text hyperlink. So is “Customer
Satisfaction Surveys.”
You can select already-entered text and make it a hyperlink, or you can enter new text.
Either way, follow these steps:

These steps take you through the process generically; see the sections in “Choosing the Hyperlink
Note
Address” later in the chapter for specific information about various kinds of hyperlinks you can
create.

1. To use existing text, select the text or its text box. Otherwise, just position the
insertion point where you want the hyperlink.
2. Choose Insert_Hyperlink or press Ctrl+K. The Insert Hyperlink dialog box opens.
See Figure 21-6.




Figure 21-6: Insert a hyperlink by typing the text to display and choosing the address of
the slide or other location to jump to.
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3. In the Text to Display field, type or edit the hyperlink text. This text is what will
appear underlined on the slide. Any text you™ve selected will appear in this field by
default; changing the text here changes it on your slide as well.
4. Enter the hyperlink or select it from one of the available lists. (See the following
section, “Choosing the Hyperlink Address,” to learn about your options in this
regard.)
5. (Optional) The default ScreenTip for a hyperlink is its address (URL). If you want
the ScreenTip to show something different when the user points the mouse at the
hyperlink, click the ScreenTip button and enter the text for the ScreenTip. See
Figure 21-7.




Figure 21-7: Enter a custom ScreenTip if desired.


Internet Explorer supports ScreenTips (in version 4.0 and higher), but other browsers may not.
Caution
This is not an issue if you plan to distribute the presentation in PowerPoint format, but if you
plan to convert it to Web pages, it might make a difference.

6. Click OK to close the Set Hyperlink ScreenTip dialog box.
7. Click OK to accept the newly created hyperlink.

Choosing the hyperlink address
You can use the Insert Hyperlink dialog box to create a hyperlink to any address that™s
accessible via the computer where the presentation will run. Although many people think of
a hyperlink as an Internet address, it can actually be a link to any file, application, Internet
location, or slide.

A hyperlink will not work if the person viewing the presentation does not have access to the
Caution needed files and programs or does not have the needed Internet or network connectivity. A
hyperlink that works fine on your own PC might not work after the presentation has been trans-
ferred to the user™s PC.
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Possible addresses to hyperlink to include the following:
¦ Other slides in the current presentation
¦ Slides in other presentations (if you provide access to those presentations)
¦ Documents created in other applications (if the user has those applications installed
and those document files are available)
¦ Graphic files (if the user has access to an application that can display them)
¦ Internet Web pages (if the user has an Internet connection and a Web browser)
¦ E-mail addresses (if the user has an Internet connection and an e-mail program)
¦ FTP site addresses (if the user has an Internet connection and a Web browser or an
FTP program)

Creating a link to a slide in this presentation
The most common kind of link is to another slide in the same presentation. There are lots of
uses for this link type; you might, for example, hide several backup slides that contain extra
information. You can then create hyperlinks on certain key slides that allow the users to
jump to one of those hidden slides to peruse the extra facts.
To create a link to another slide, follow these steps:
1. To use existing text, select the text or its text box. Otherwise, just position the
insertion point where you want the hyperlink.
2. Choose Insert_Hyperlink or press Ctrl+K. The Insert Hyperlink dialog box opens.
3. In the Text to Display field, type or edit the hyperlink text. This text is what will
appear underlined on the slide. Any text you™ve selected will appear in this field by
default; changing text here changes it on your slide as well.
4. Click the Place in This Document button. The dialog box controls change to show a
list of the slides in the presentation. See Figure 21-8.




Figure 21-8: Select the slide that the hyperlink should refer to.
Chapter 21 ¦ Designing User-Interactive PowerPoint Presentations 505

5. Select the slide you want.
6. (Optional) If you want the presentation to continue from the original spot after
showing this slide, mark the Show and Return check box. If you prefer that the
presentation continue from the new location forward, leave it unmarked.
7. Click OK.

Creating a link to an existing file
You can also create a hyperlink to any file available on your PC™s hard disk or on your
local area network. This can be a PowerPoint file or a data file for any other program,
such as a Word document or an Excel spreadsheet. Or, if you don™t want to open a particu-
lar data file, you can hyperlink to the program file itself, so that the other application
simply opens.
For example, perhaps you have some detailed documentation for your product in Adobe
Acrobat format (PDF). This type of document requires the Adobe Acrobat reader. So you
could create a hyperlink with the text “Click here to read the documentation” and link to the
appropriate PDF file. When your audience member clicks that link, Adobe Acrobat Reader
opens and the documentation displays.
To link to a file, follow these steps:
1. To use existing text, select the text or its text box. Otherwise, just position the
insertion point where you want the hyperlink.
2. Choose Insert_Hyperlink or press Ctrl+K. The Insert Hyperlink dialog box opens.
3. In the Text to Display field, type or edit the hyperlink text. This text is what will
appear underlined on the slide.
4. In the Insert Hyperlink dialog box, click the Existing File or Web Page button.
5. Do one of the following:
Click Current Folder to display a file management interface from which you can
select any folder or drive on your system. Then navigate to the location containing
the file and select the file. See Figure 21-9.
OR
Click Recent Files to display a list of the files you have recently opened on this PC
(all types). Then click the file you want from the list.

You are not limited to only the folder on your local drives if you choose Current Folder; you can
open the Look In list and choose My Network Places to browse the network. However, make
Note
sure that the PC on which the presentation will be displayed will also have access to this same
location.
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Figure 21-9: Select any file to hyperlink to.

6. Click OK to return to the Insert Hyperlink dialog box.
7. Click OK to insert the hyperlink.

Using a hyperlink to an executable file can result in a warning message each time it is clicked if
Tip the file being linked to is executable or is a data file containing macros. To avoid this, first ensure
that macro security is set to Low (Tools_Macro_Security). Then, instead of using a hyperlink,
use an Action Setting and choose Run Program as the action. For the program to run, use the
full path to the application, in quotation marks, followed by a space and then the full path to the
document, also in quotation marks. Because you must enter the full paths to each of these, the
link will probably not work when the presentation is run on a different computer.


Creating a link to a Web or FTP site
If you want to link to a Web or FTP site, as you learned earlier in the chapter, you can
simply type the address directly into any text box. Alternatively, you can use the Insert
Hyperlink command to create the link, as follows:
1. To use existing text, select the text or its text box. Otherwise, just position the
insertion point where you want the hyperlink.
2. Choose Insert_Hyperlink or press Ctrl+K. The Insert Hyperlink dialog box opens.
3. In the Text to Display field, type or edit the hyperlink text. This text is what will
appear underlined on the slide. Any text you™ve selected will appear in this field by
default; changing text here changes it on your slide as well.
4. From the Insert Hyperlink dialog box, click the Existing File or Web Page button.
Chapter 21 ¦ Designing User-Interactive PowerPoint Presentations 507

5. If you know the exact Web or FTP address that you want to link to, type it in the
Address box. Then click OK. Otherwise, go to Step 6.
6. Click Browsed Pages to display a list of pages you have visited recently (including
pages from PowerPoint™s Help system). See Figure 21-10.




Figure 21-10: You can select recently viewed or recently linked files from the list, or click
Browse the Web to open a Web browser from which to find the desired page.

7. If the address you want appears as a result of Step 6, click it and click OK. Other-
wise, go on to Step 8.
8. Click the Browse the Web button to browse for the page you want. Internet Ex-
plorer (or your default Web browser) opens.

If the Dial-Up Connection dialog box appears prompting you to connect to the Internet, enter
Note
your username and password, if needed, and then click Connect.

9. In Internet Explorer, navigate to the page that you want to hyperlink to. You can
use your Favorites list or look up the page with a search site such as the one found
at www.google.com.
10. When you have arrived at the page you want, copy the URL from the address bar in
your browser, and then jump back to PowerPoint by clicking its button on your
Windows task bar. Paste the URL in the Address box of the PowerPoint dialog box
using Ctrl+V.
11. Click OK to create the link.
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Creating a link to a new document
Perhaps you want the audience to be able to create a new document by clicking a
hyperlink. For example, perhaps you would like them to be able to provide information
about their experience with your Customer Service department. One way to do this is to
let them create a new document using a program that they have on their system, such as a
word processor.

Caution Be careful to set up a new document hyperlink to create a new document using a program that
you are sure your audience members will have access to.

To create a link to a new document, follow these steps:
1. To use existing text, select the text or its text box. Otherwise, just position the
insertion point where you want the hyperlink.
2. Choose Insert_Hyperlink or press Ctrl+K. The Insert Hyperlink dialog box opens.
3. In the Text to Display field, type or edit the hyperlink text. This text is what will
appear underlined on the slide.
4. From the Insert Hyperlink dialog box, click Create New Document. The dialog box
controls change, as shown in Figure 21-11.



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