<< . .

. 8
( : 51)



. . >>

settings. In many cases, however, you will need to configure some additional settings. You
can do this when adding the account, or change the settings afterward. On the Exchange
Server Settings Wizard page, click More Settings to open the Microsoft Exchange Server
property sheet shown in Figure 3-4. The following sections explain the options available in
this property sheet.




Figure 3-4: Use the General page to configure connection settings.
Chapter 3 ¦ Configuring Outlook 2003 57


Setting general properties
The General page controls basic settings and the connection state for the account. The
following list summarizes the options:
Exchange Account. Specify the name by which you want the account to appear in
the profile™s account list. By default, the name is Microsoft Exchange Server.
Automatically Detect Connection State. Let Outlook choose the connection state
automatically. Choose this option if you never disconnect your computer from the
network, or if you simply want Outlook to detect the connection state by itself.
Manually Control Connection State. This option enables you to control whether
Outlook uses the Exchange Server mailbox or the locally cached copy, rather than
allow Outlook to control the connection state. If you do not choose the option
Choose the Connection Type When Starting, Outlook automatically uses the
connection method specified by the Default Connection State options.
Choose the Connection Type When Starting. Select this option to have Outlook
prompt you at startup to select the type of connection method to use.
Connect with the Network. Use this option to have Outlook connect to the server
through the local area network, whether through a hardwired connection or existing
dial-up.
Work Offline and Use Dial-Up Networking. Have Outlook dial a specified dial-up
connection to connect to the Exchange Server.
Seconds Until Server Connection Timeout. Set the amount of time Outlook will
wait for responses from the Exchange Server before timing out. Increase the value if
you are working over a slow link, such as a dial-up connection, that frequently
causes Outlook to timeout and disconnect.

Setting advanced options
The Advanced page (Figure 3-5) enables you to open one or more other mailboxes along
with your own. For example, an assistant for a small group of users might open the
mailboxes of those other users to manage their schedules or handle mail processing. Or,
perhaps you want to keep your mail in separate mailboxes for different purposes. Whatever
the case, you can click Add to specify a mailbox name, and add it to the list of mailboxes
that Outlook will open at startup.
Part I ¦ Getting Functional with Office 2003
58




Figure 3-5: Use the Advanced page to configure mailbox settings.


You can also open a single folder from another user™s mailbox by choosing File_Open_Other
Tip
User™s Folder. With either method, you must either own the mailbox or have been given del-
egate access to it.

The settings under the Mailbox Settings group let you specify how Outlook downloads
messages from the mailbox, and whether it uses a local copy of the mailbox or works only
from the server:
Use Local Copy of Mailbox. Select this option to use Cached Exchange Mode (CEM),
which directs Outlook to create a local copy of the mailbox on your computer.
Download Only Headers. Used with CEM, this option directs Outlook to download
only headers to the local cache, and leave the item bodies and attachments on the
server.
Download Headers Followed by the Full Item. Outlook first downloads all headers
and then begins downloading the item bodies and attachments.
Download Full Items. Outlook downloads each item in its entirety.
The option you choose depends on how much of the item you need and your current
connection state. Download only the headers if you™re working over a slow link or have a
large amount of data in the mailbox and want to speed up offline synchronization. If you
choose the option Download Headers Followed by the Full Item, Outlook will be able to
synchronize the headers fairly quickly so you can see what items the mailbox contains. If the
synchronization is interrupted, you will at least be able to see what™s in the mailbox, even if
you can™t see the contents of some of the items. Choose the Download Full Items option if
you don™t have connection problems or are working from a fast connection, and you want all
of the items downloaded.
Chapter 3 ¦ Configuring Outlook 2003 59


Setting the offline store location
Outlook uses an offline store (OST) file to store the offline mailbox cache. You can use an
OST whether or not you work in cached mode. When you use an OST without CEM,
Outlook functions just as it did in previous versions with an OST file. Synchronization
doesn™t take place until you perform a send/receive for the Exchange Server account, either
manually or at a scheduled send/receive. Outlook uses the OST only if it can™t connect to the
Exchange Server.
With CEM, Outlook defaults to using the OST and handles synchronization automatically
based on the settings you provided in the Mailbox Settings group on the Advanced property
page. The main distinction between the two, therefore, is that with CEM, Outlook always
uses the OST and handles synchronization for you.
When you enable CEM, Outlook automatically creates an OST to contain the offline cache.
You can™t directly change the location of the OST, which you might want to do if you™re
running low on disk space where the OST resides. You can, however, disable offline storage
and then re-enable it to change the location. Follow these steps to accomplish the change:
1. Close Outlook, and start the E-mail Accounts Wizard from the Mail applet in the
Control Panel.
2. Click E-mail Accounts; then choose View or Change Existing E-mail Accounts,
and click Next.
3. Select the Exchange Server account, and click Change.
4. Clear the Use Local Copy of Mailbox option, and click Next; then click Finish.
5. Repeat steps 2 and 3.
6. Click More Settings and then click the Advanced tab.
7. Click Offline Folder File Settings, click Disable Offline Use, and click Yes when
prompted.
8. Click OK; then Next and then Finish.
9. Repeat steps 2, 3, and 6.
10. Click Offline Folder File Settings, click Browse, and specify a new path and
location for the OST; then click Open.
11. Click OK and then click Yes when prompted to create the new OST (assuming you
specified a new one and not an existing one).
12. Enable the option Use Local Copy of Mailbox on the Advanced page; then click
OK.
13. Click Next and then Finish; then Close.
When you start Outlook, it will use the new OST and will synchronize it accordingly.
If you want to use Outlook with an OST file but without CEM, you can follow the
previous steps 1 through 11 to create a new OST file. Close the account properties without
Part I ¦ Getting Functional with Office 2003
60

enabling the Use Local Copy of Mailbox option. Keep in mind that you must manually
perform a synchronization, or use a scheduled send/receive to synchronize the OST before
Outlook can use it.

Configuring security settings
You can configure a small number of security settings for an Exchange Server account on
the Security page of the account™s properties (Figure 3-6).




Figure 3-6: Use the Security page to enable encryption and specify authentication
settings.

Following is an explanation of these settings:
Encrypt Information. Use this option to enable encryption to secure transmission
between the client and server computers. Always Prompt for User Name and Pass-
word. Select this option to require Outlook to prompt you for your account and
password, rather than caching it and logging on automatically. You should use this
option if you leave your computer unattended or share a computer with others.
Logon Network Security. Choose the authentication method required by your server.
Use Password Authentication (NTLM) if your Exchange Server is running on Windows
NT or you need to use NTLM when accessing a Windows 2000 or Windows 2003
Server. Choose Kerberos if your Exchange Server supports Kerberos-based authentica-
tion. Kerberos is the default authentication mechanism for Windows 2000 and Win-
dows 2003 Server platforms.

The Distributed Password Authentication (DPA) option available in Outlook 2002 is not included
Note
with Outlook 2003.
Chapter 3 ¦ Configuring Outlook 2003 61


Configuring connection settings
Use the Connection page of the Exchange Server™s additional settings (Figure 3-7) to tell
Outlook how to connect to the Exchange Server. Choose an option based on the following list:
Connect Using My Local Area Network. Select this option if you connect through a
LAN, or want to use a dial-up connection that is already dialed and connected.
Connect Using My Phone Line. Select this option to use a specific dial-up connection
to the Internet or server™s network. Use the Modem group of controls on the page to
select the dial-up connection and set its properties.
Connect Using Internet Explorer™s or a 3rd Party Dialer. Select this option to use
the dialer configured in Internet Explorer, or to use a third-party dialer included with
other network client software.




Figure 3-7: Use the Connection page to specify how Outlook connects to the Exchange
Server.

The option Connect to my Exchange Mailbox Using HTTP lets you connect to the server
across the LAN or Internet using the HTTP protocol. This connection method enables you to
connect to an Exchange Server sitting behind a firewall that blocks traffic other than HTTP
(port 80). It™s also a handy mechanism for remote users who need to access an Exchange
Server across the Internet but don™t want to use Outlook Web Access (OWA) or when OWA
isn™t supported on the server.
Click Exchange Proxy Settings to open the Connection dialog box (Figure 3-8), which
enables you to specify proxy settings for the connection to the server. These settings are
self-explanatory.
Part I ¦ Getting Functional with Office 2003
62




Figure 3-8: Use the Connection dialog box to configure proxy settings for the connection.


Configuring Remote Mail settings
You can use the Remote Mail page to configure general options for using Remote Mail with
the Exchange Server account. Remote Mail enables you to retrieve headers only and/or
retrieve only those messages that fit the filter criteria you specify.

Configuring POP3 and IMAP accounts
Post Office Protocol 3 (POP3) has long been the primary protocol used by Internet mail
servers. POP3 is gradually being replaced by Internet Mail Access Protocol (IMAP), and by
HTTP-based mail, such as that used by Hotmail and Yahoo!. Both POP3 and IMAP are
standards-based, public protocols supported by a wide variety of mail servers. Most Internet
Service Providers (ISPs) that offer mail accounts support both POP3 and IMAP.
POP3 is primarily an offline protocol, which means you download the messages from the
server and work with them locally. IMAP, by contrast, is primarily an online protocol. You
work with your IMAP folders and messages from the server. The fact that the messages
remain on the server simplifies the synchronization problems (such as having messages
scattered on different computers) you would otherwise face if you needed to access the same
POP3 account from more than one computer. Another useful benefit to IMAP is the
capability it gives you to selectively process messages and attachments without downloading
them from the server; however, you can gain most of these advantages for all account types
by using Outlook™s Remote Mail features.
Chapter 3 ¦ Configuring Outlook 2003 63


IMAP offers better security than POP3 because it uses a challenge-response mechanism to
Tip
authenticate the user, rather than passing the password across the network as plain text.

If your server supports both POP3 and IMAP, this author recommends using IMAP. The
configuration process is essentially the same for each.
1. Start the E-mail Accounts Wizard from the Mail applet in the Control Panel and then
click E-mail Accounts. Alternatively, choose Tools_E-mail Accounts in Outlook.
2. Choose Add a New E-mail Account and then click Next.
3. Choose POP3 if adding a POP3 account, or IMAP if adding an IMAP account; then
click Next.
4. On the Internet E-mail Settings page (Figure 3-9), specify settings according to the
following list:
Your Name. Specify your name as you want it to appear in the From field of messages
that others receive from you through this account.
E-mail Address. Enter the e-mail address for the account in the form
account@domain, such as jim@boyce.us.
Incoming Mail Server. Specify the IP address or DNS name of the server where your
mailbox is located.
Outgoing Mail Server. Specify the IP address or DNS name of the SMTP server that
this account should use for sending outgoing mail. The outgoing and incoming servers
need not be the same, and in the case of large ISPs such as CompuServe, are often
different.
User Name. Enter the name of your mailbox or logon name on the server. Typically,
this is the first part of your e-mail address. Do not include the @domain portion of the
address.
Password. Specify the password associated with the account you entered in the User
Name field.
Remember Password. Select this option to have Outlook cache the password. Clear
the option if you want Outlook to prompt you for the password each time it connects to
the server. Clearing this option provides better security and prevents others from
retrieving your mail when you are away from the computer.
Log On Using Secure Password Authentication (SPA). Select this option if the mail
server requires SPA for authentication. Most mail servers do not.
Part I ¦ Getting Functional with Office 2003
64




Figure 3-9: Use the Internet E-mail Settings page to configure basic account properties
for POP3 and IMAP accounts.


You can click Test Account Settings when creating a POP3 account to send a test message
Tip
through a specified outgoing mail server and attempt a logon to the incoming mail server. This
helps you verify your settings before you finish creating the account.

In most situations you can click Next and then Finish at this point to create the account;
however, you can configure additional settings, if needed. Click More Settings to display the
Internet E-mail Settings property sheet. The General, Outgoing Server, and Connection
pages are the same for POP3 and IMAP accounts. Most of the options on the Advanced page
are the same, with a few exceptions. The following sections describe the available options.

General settings
Use the Mail Account field on the General page to specify the account name as you want it
to appear in Outlook™s list of accounts. You can add a company or organization name in the
Organization field. These settings are optional.
Use the Reply E-mail field to specify the reply to message property for the account. By
default, the account uses the e-mail address you specify in the E-mail Address field for the
account as the reply address. In some situations, however, you might want these to be
different. For example, you might want replies sent to a discussion list rather than to your
own mail address.
Chapter 3 ¦ Configuring Outlook 2003 65


Outgoing server settings
Use the settings on the Outgoing Server page to enable authentication for your SMTP server.
You can use the same authentication credentials as for the incoming server, or specify a
different account and password. You can also configure the account to use Secure Password
Authentication (SPA) for the outgoing server, if required.
POP3 accounts have an additional setting on this page: Log on to incoming mail server
before sending mail. Enable if your account is serviced by the same server for incoming and
outgoing mail, and requires that you authenticate to send messages.

Connection settings
Use the Connection page to specify how Outlook should connect to the server(s) to send and
receive messages. Use the LAN option if you connect through a network, or want to use
whatever dial-up connection is already established at the time you perform a send/receive.
The option Connect via modem when Outlook is offline, if enabled, causes Outlook to dial
the connection specified by the Modem options when Outlook detects that the server is
offline. Check your operating system™s Help documentation if you need help configuring a
dial-up account.

Advanced settings
The Advanced page differs slightly between POP3 and IMAP accounts. Figure 3-10 shows
the POP3 version.




Figure 3-10: The Advanced page for POP3 accounts.
Part I ¦ Getting Functional with Office 2003
66

Figure 3-11 shows the IMAP version.




Figure 3-11: The Advanced page for IMAP accounts.

The Incoming and Outgoing server options specify the ports on which the mail servers are
configured to respond to incoming and outgoing mail requests, respectively. (In this usage,
incoming means mail coming from the server to you, and outgoing means mail going from
your computer to the server.) The default port for POP3 is 110 and is 143 for IMAP. The
default SMTP port is 25. For both POP3 and IMAP, you can select the SSL connection if the
server requires SSL for added security.
Use the Server Timeouts slider to set the amount of time that Outlook will wait for the server
to respond to requests before timing out. Increase the timeout if you are working over a slow
connection or with a busy server that tends to time out your sessions before they complete.

POP3 delivery
A POP3 account™s properties include a Delivery group of options that determine how
Outlook handles the messages on the server. These options are:
Leave a Copy of Messages on the Server. Download a copy of the message from the
server, but don™t delete the original from the server. Use this option when you want to
be able to retrieve the messages from other computers, or when you are troubleshooting
and don™t want Outlook to remove the messages from the server.
Remove from Server After n Days. Select this option to have downloaded messages
removed from the server after the specified number of days has elapsed.
Remove from Server When Deleted from ˜Deleted Items™. Select this option to have
Outlook remove the messages from the server when they are removed from the Deleted
Items folder, either manually by you or automatically by Outlook.
Chapter 3 ¦ Configuring Outlook 2003 67


IMAP folders
The Advanced page for an IMAP account contains only one setting that is different from
those for a POP3 account. The Root Folder Path specifies the path to the folder in your
mailbox that you want to use as the root folder for the mailbox. Leave this field blank if
you™re not sure of the folder path, and Outlook will use the default root for the account on
the server.

Understanding where Outlook stores your POP3
and IMAP messages
When you add a POP3 account and you already have a default mail store configured for the
profile such as an Exchange Server mailbox, set of personal folders, or PST file, Outlook
uses that default mail store as the delivery location for your POP3 mail. The other folders in
the default store serve to contain the Calendar, Contacts, and other non-mail folders. If there
are no other existing accounts, Outlook creates a PST to contain the message store. It uses
this same PST to store the nonmail items, as well.
When you create an IMAP account, Outlook automatically creates a PST to contain the
IMAP account™s folders. It does this even if you already have a message store for another
account. Each IMAP account you add gets its own PST. Outlook also creates a PST to
contain your nonmail Outlook folders.

Configuring HTTP accounts
Similar to Outlook 2002, Outlook 2003 supports HTTP-based e-mail accounts for MSN and
Hotmail. Follow these steps to configure an HTTP account:
1. Start the E-mail Accounts Wizard from the Mail applet in the Control Panel, and
click E-mail Accounts. Alternatively choose Tools_E-mail Accounts in Outlook.
2. Choose Add a New E-mail Account and then click Next.
3. Choose HTTP, and click Next.
4. On the Internet E-mail Settings page (Figure 3-12), specify settings according to the
following list:
Your Name. Specify your name as you want it to appear in the From field of messages
that others receive from you through this account.
E-mail Address. Enter the e-mail address for the account in the form
account@domain, such as jimboyce999@hotmail.com.
HTTP Mail Service Provider. Select either Hotmail or MSN, depending on your
account type. You can select Other if you have the URL of an HTTP mail server
compatible with Outlook.
Server URL. This field is read-only for Hotmail and MSN accounts. Enter the URL for
your mail server if you selected Other from the HTTP Mail Service Provider drop-
down list.
Part I ¦ Getting Functional with Office 2003
68

User Name. Enter the name of your mailbox or logon name on the server. Outlook
creates this field automatically if you choose the MSN or Hotmail server options based
on your e-mail address.
Password. Specify the password associated with the account you entered in the User
Name field.
Remember Password. Select this option to have Outlook cache the password. Clear
the option if you want Outlook to prompt you for the password each time it connects to
the server. Clearing this option provides better security and prevents others from
retrieving your mail when you are away from the computer.
Log On Using Secure Password Authentication (SPA). Select this option if the mail
server requires SPA for authentication. Most mail servers do not.




Figure 3-12: Use the Internet E-mail Settings page to configure basic account properties
for POP3 and IMAP accounts.

As with other types of accounts, you can click More Settings to set a handful of other
options. These are the same as those on the General and Connection pages specified in the
sections, “General settings” and “Connection settings,” earlier in this chapter.


Adding Data Files
The previous section explained how to add e-mail accounts to an Outlook profile. When you
add a POP3 account with no existing Exchange Server account, Outlook creates a personal

<< . .

. 8
( : 51)



. . >>